Street Moves

© Credit: Elsa Soläng

The Street Moves project reimagines and redesigns streets with pedestrians, sustainable forms of transport and the local community in mind; transforming streets into multifunctional and inclusive spaces.

REIMAGINING STREETS

Street Moves is a project that reclaims parking spaces to improve urban living. Experimenting with prototypes that give priority to pedestrians and cyclists, the aim is to reconsider what streets could be used for to improve both civic engagement and sustainable mobility. Moving away from unsustainable and excluding public spaces, Street Moves breaks new ground. It is an innovative approach to mobility and a first step to transform our street views, unleashing the potential of streets to operate as living rooms for citizens. 

INTERACTIVE, FUNCTIONAL SPACES

Street Moves aims to create interactive streets where citizens can play, cultivate or just hang out. Experimenting with wooden material, that could be changed based on local needs, multifunctional public spaces are recreated. It is about creating outdoor furniture, playgrounds, gardens and outdoor gyms, but also charging stations for shared cars and electric scooter parking. By experimenting with interactive environments, citizens' needs and desires are taken into account. This is not only beneficial for children and young adults, but also for future generations as they move away from a fossil-fuel dependent society. 

POSITIVE CHANGES

According to a survey, more than 70% of the respondents who live in these areas or often pass these streets said the changes made are positive, only 10% of responses were negative. Street Moves has been created by ArkDes Think Tank, together with several players who do not usually collaborate including; the City of Stockholm, the Swedish Transport Agency, the car-sharing company M, Volvo Car Mobility and the electric scooter service Voi. The project is funded by the Swedish innovation agency – Vinnova.

Project owner
Daniel Helldén
Vice Mayor, Member of the City Excecutive Board, Head of the Traffic Division