Super Circular Estate

Netherlands
Kerkrade
Innovation in Politics Awards
Ecology, Housing, Quality of Life

Outdated high-rise buildings are deconstructed and the recovered materials reused to build sustainable, modern social housing units, with low carbon footprints.

DECLINING POPULATION REDUCES HOUSING DEMAND

Kerkrade, like many other towns in the south-east of the Netherlands, is experiencing a declining population. Over the next thirty years, the population of the town is expected to decrease by 27%. This will result in a reduced demand for housing in the coming decades. Old high-rise apartment buildings, built in the 1960s, have therefore become redundant.

REDUNDANT BUILDINGS CONVERTED INTO MODERN HOUSING

However, old buildings contain valuable materials that can be reused to construct housing for the 21st century. The Municipality of Kerkrade, in collaboration with public and private stakeholders, is currently building new housing units using 100% recycled material from the outdated high-rise buildings.

SOCIAL HOUSES BUILT WITH 100% RECYCLED MATERIALS

The Super Circular Estate project aims to experiment with innovative building techniques and encourage social housing associations to use sustainable and resource-efficient solutions. The project's practical outcome is the creation of 130 new social houses built with 100% recycled materials. A great example is the block on Voorterstraat, half of which will be demolished while the other half will be renovated using the materials recovered. As a result, no less than 1 million kg of CO₂ emissions are saved compared to building new flats.

Outdated high-rise buildings are deconstructed and the recovered materials reused to construct sustainable, modern social housing units, with low carbon footprints.

Tim Weijers - Alderman and Deputy Mayor
Project owner
Tim Weijers
Alderman and Deputy Mayor
Project owner
Marco Theunissen
Junior Project Leader